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Statement on June Medical Services v. Russo

Monday morning, the Supreme Court of the United States handed down an unfavorable decision in the case June Medical Services v. Russo. This decision struck down the law requiring abortion providers have admitting privileges at local hospitals.

“Admitting privileges are a reasonable standard,” says Lois Anderson, ORTL executive director. “Women are injured inside abortion facilities every year. Admitting privileges mean they will receive prompt, specific care. The only reason this is an issue is because abortion is big business and businesses don’t want to spend time and money.”

“This decision was not reasonable,” continued Anderson. “However, an atrocious reality we face is that Oregon does not even require abortion providers be licensed medical doctors, let alone have admitting privileges. Abortion is legal in Oregon until the moment of birth, with no restrictions or regulations mandated by the state.”

Apart from chemical abortions with RU-486 (which alone have caused more than 4,200 serious complications and 24 deaths) abortion procedures are surgical procedures.

Admitting privileges for outpatient surgery centers is a common standard. For example, in order for outpatient surgery centers to participate in the federal Medicare program, their physicians must have a transfer agreement with their closest hospital or have admitting privileges. 

Photo of the March for Life outside the SCOTUS by Maria Oswalt with Rehumanize International

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